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Wednesday, 10 January 2018 00:25

Social Security: When to Apply? Featured

Russell Gloor, AMAC Certified Social Security Advisor

Ask Rusty - When Should I Apply for Social Security?

Dear Rusty: I will be turning 62 in 2018; birth date 9/24/1955. My husband is 77 and receiving Social Security.  Longevity runs in my family. I have been self-employed all my life. I am still working and my husband collects a pension, Social Security and RMD from a traditional IRA, so there is no need for additional monies under my current circumstances. When should I start taking Social Security?   Signed:  Thinking about Retirement

Dear Thinking: The question of when to take Social Security normally gets an answer of "It depends on your health, your family history of longevity, and your need for the money".  You've already addressed those items so I'll focus on your main question - when should you start taking Social Security? 

Even though you'll be eligible to collect Social Security when you turn 62, if you do so you will only get 74.17% of the retirement benefit you would be entitled to at your full retirement age (FRA). Whenever you apply, you will be deemed to be filing not only for your own retirement benefit but also any spousal benefit you may be entitled to from your husband's work record. Similar to your SS retirement benefit, your spousal benefit would also be reduced because you took it early; instead of being 50% of your husband's benefit at your FRA, you would only get 35% at age 62 (if that is larger than your own retirement benefit). The point I'm making is that by claiming SS early, any benefit you're entitled to will be reduced from what you would get at your full retirement age. 

Just as you are penalized for claiming before your full retirement age, you are rewarded for waiting beyond it to claim Social Security retirement benefits. In fact, for each year you wait beyond your full retirement age, your retirement benefit will be 8% higher than it would be at your FRA. That will continue up until you are 70 years old when your retirement benefit will be 30.67% higher than it would have been at your FRA. You stop earning additional credit at age 70, so there's no reason to wait beyond that to apply. Let's use an easy example to illustrate: If your FRA retirement benefit is $1000, by applying at age 62 you would only get $741 per month instead of $1000. But if you wait until you are 70 to claim benefits, you would get $1306 per month, nearly twice what you would get by applying at age 62. 

There are two other factors you should incorporate into your thinking: 

1) At your FRA, you will be entitled to ½ of your husband's benefit at his FRA.  If your spousal benefit at your FRA is substantially more than your own retirement benefit, then applying at your FRA may be a good strategy, as opposed to waiting and earning delayed retirement credits. 

2) Once you have reached your FRA you will be entitled to 100% of your husband's benefit amount if he should predecease you. If your eventual survivor's benefit would be more than your own FRA benefit amount, you might be better served by claiming your retirement benefit earlier than age 70. 

As you can see, most of the answer to your question depends upon whether your benefits as a spouse or a survivor will be more than your benefit based upon your own work record. If not, then waiting beyond your FRA up to age 70 will yield you the maximum retirement benefit. But if your spouse and/or survivor's benefit will be more than your own retirement benefits, then applying at your full retirement age may be the best strategy. If you haven't already done so, I suggest you go to www.ssa.gov and set up your personal "My Social Security" account which will give you access to your currently estimated retirement benefit. Comparing that to your potential spousal and survivor benefits should give you the answer you're seeking. 


The information presented in this article is intended for general information purposes only. The opinions and interpretations expressed are the viewpoints of the AMAC Foundation's Social Security Advisory staff, trained and accredited under the National Social Security Advisors program of the National Social Security Association, LLC (NSSA). NSSA, the AMAC Foundation, and the Foundation's Social Security Advisors are not affiliated with or endorsed by the United States Government, the Social Security Administration, or any other state government. Furthermore, the AMAC Foundation and its staff do not provide legal or accounting services. The Foundation welcomes questions from readers regarding Social Security issues. To submit a request, contact the Foundation at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Last modified on Thursday, 11 January 2018 00:58
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